Maybe they look like piles of leaves but long ago…

looking from Carrington's position in the main line toward the right.

looking from Carrington’s position in the main line toward the right.

Looking from Carrington's position at the West Angle toward the left, the intended field of fire.
Looking from Carrington’s position at the West Angle toward the left, the intended field of fire

from the other lunette alongside the west McCoull Lane looking across the intended field of fire
from the other lunette alongside the west McCoull Lane looking across the intended field of fire Notice the ground in the distance sloping upward.

Looking across the face of the West Angle. The round marker indicates the large oak that was shot down.
Looking across the face of the West Angle. The round marker indicates the large oak that was shot down That oak stood at the end of the traverse beside Carrington’s righthand gun.

Looking out from the trench at the apex of the East Angle toward the Landrum house.
Looking out from the trench at the apex of the East Angle toward the Landrum house. Note the rolling terrain.

Looking toward the Landrum House from the trenches at the East Angle.

Looking toward the Landrum House from the trenches at the East Angle.

Another view from a slightly different position in the East Angle trench
Another view from a slightly different position in the East Angle trench

behind the eastern leg of the salient. Excavations for road fill, or wartime? TBD
behind the eastern leg of the salient. Excavations for road fill, or wartime? TBD

behind the West Angle, note the second line ahead as well as the new NPS signs in the distance.
behind the West Angle, note the second line ahead as well as the new NPS signs in the distance. Taken from inside the position.

Taken at an angle from inside the position. Note the broken sapling. Gives an idea of depth.
taken at an angle from inside the position. Note the broken sapling. Gives an idea of depth.

between the West and East Angle. In distance at center of photo is East Angle.
between the West and East Angle. In distance at center of photo is East Angle.

looking across a very nice position. Note excavation on inside in shape of a horseshoe. This leaves the center raised, and a low parapet remains.
looking across a very nice position. Note excavation on inside in shape of a horseshoe. This leaves the center raised, and a low parapet remains.

Similar to the previous photo. Interior ditch, dirt thrown outward.
Similar to the previous photo. Interior ditch, dirt thrown outward.

Note the severity of the slope. No parapet left, has it washed away?
Note the severity of the slope. No parapet left, has it washed away?

Another view of the position shown previously. Good view of the depth of exterior ditching.
Another view of the position shown previously. Good view of the depth of exterior ditching.

Obviously this position interested me. Think this is about the 4th photo of it.
Obviously this position interested me. Think this is about the 4th photo of it.

One more time.
One more time.

interior ditching. Not as far down the slope.
interior ditching. Not as far down the slope.

My favorite Spotsy position. Note how it is constructed compared to the others.
My favorite Spotsy position. Note how it is constructed compared to the others[gallery]

 

During my explorations on the area within the Muleshoe I have taken a bunch of pictures. Most of them the camera makes look like a pile of leaves. But each of these pictures has a story to tell. They show all that is left behind of those days in May of 1864. Back then a mound of dirt might mean the difference between life and death, and often did.

So what it is worth I show these to you.

About Russ

Avid student of military history as well as amateur historian. Has a keen interest in archaeology. Founded his company Roadraceparts.com in 2004.
Gallery | This entry was posted in Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse, Battle of the Muleshoe, Bloody Angle, Carrington's Battery, Cutshaw's Battalion, Muleshoe, Uncategorized, West Angle and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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